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Mark McNairy has tapped Woolrich’s long history of hunting and military garb in the seasons he’s been at the helm of Woolrich Woolen Mills. But recently he found himself at a vintage car show, appreciating the artifacts from what he called “the beginning of the American infatuation with an automobile.” McNairy set himself the task of imagining the WWM wardrobe as a kind of early-driver’s uniform: slouchy tweeds with braces, mixed-media flat caps, a full Donegal suit. His fabrics have always been drawn from the Woolrich archive, but he’s always given each a tweak. For Fall, for the first time, they’re repro’ed in facsimile. Style.com